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Biography

 

Richard Moss was born in Derbyshire, England on July 5th 1950 . The younger of two sons born  to Margaret Hannah and Thomas Fredrick Donald Moss, he was educated at Sterndale school near Buxton, and later in Australia and New Zealand.

He studied mechanics and hydraulics at the Auckland Technical Institute, and was set for a career mending earth moving equipment, when a burning desire to study his great passions of opera and theatre,led to travel and study in the arts.
Richard studied voice with Pacini and Milverton Carta, and  Theatre at the Bailey Academy of Dramatic Art   (Auckland NZ)  under Gil Cornwall LGSM, who introduced him to the classics, a three years study of Shakespeare and Chekhov, and a grounding in the techniques of Constantin Stanislavsky.

More than a teacher and mentor, Gil Cornwall was an invaluable guide at one of life's major crossroads, and his influence continues to illuminate the path to this day.
 "When I first met Gil," said Richard, "I thought  Ibsen was a brand of fountain pen."

winning second prize in the national Shakespeare and Dickens awards, in the year that the  talented and beautiful Jill Ellis Smith (Ellie Smith) was the winner, made the mantle of proxime accessit so much sweeter.


                                               Radio

It was as a radio actor at the NZBC, that Richard entered the profession, beginning with the tiny (unnamed) part of a soldier in a radio play for school children, written by Millie Adams (Millie Evans,who was also a fine actress) and entitled Young Tom's Drum. He had only three words of dialogue, whilst thumping another character on the nose, he said "Take that then." This began an initial seven year run in radio where he soon moved from B player to A player status, and eventually to many leading roles. Richard would feature in a huge number of serialized radio dramas, and many short story readings in the ensuing years, collecting three Mobil Radio awards along the way.
Children's theatre also played a large part in his career when he joined the Auckland Independent Theatre, first as an actor and later as actor/assistant director under the theatre's founder  and principle, Kevin J Wilson.
It was at this theatre in 1971, that a Christmas play Pinocchio Travelling Circus, written and directed by Ian Mune,  featured Richard as Mr Fireater the Circus Master.
Following a long and successful run at the A.I.T theatre in Auckland, Pinocchio Travelling Circus was taken up by Television New Zealand as a children's special telecast, this began a love affair with television and film which has lasted to this day.
                     TV Host and interviewer
Richard co-hosted, with the lovely and talented Tina Grenville, on Good Morning, New Zealand's first morning television show. He later worked as co producer on a world vision telethon from Perspective Video.
                          Film Work includes:
    Convict King,  Winners and Losers,   479,
    On The Day,   Mystery Crash,  Pallet on the Floor,
    Sleeping Dogs,  Finding Katy,  Prisoners, Fleur,
     Kangaroo,  Hercules Returns,  Dead End,
    Mysterious Geographic Explorations of Jasper               Morello (voices only)
    The Craic  John Doe Vigilante,   Joker Game...


         TV Dramas and Mini Series include:

 
        Hunter's Gold,  The McKenzie Affair,  Just Us,

      The Far Country,  Whose Baby?,  Ratbag Heroes,

     My Brother Tom, This Man This Woman,

     Bangkok Hilton, The Feds, Half a World Away,

 
     Pinocchio, Practice,
Homicide, Ryan, Quartet,

     Close to Home, Both Sides of the Fence, Sea Urchins,

     Country GP, Hanlon, Henderson Kids, Zoo Family,

     Prime Time, Prisoner, Neighbours, All the Way,

     Poker face,  Inside Running, Rafferty's Rules, 

   Secrets, The Power the Passion, The Magistrate,

    Phoenix, Janus, Mercury, Back Burner,

    The damnation of    Harvey Mc Hugh,

    Something in the Air, Flying Doctors, Halifax,

    Stingers, Blue Heelers, Snowy River, Crash Zone,

     Marshall Law,  Bed of Roses....    



               I Theatrum Vero

Above: The auditorium and thrust stage of the old (1910) Mercury Theatre Auckland. Here Richard worked in more than fifteen productions.  Alas no longer a theatre, the Mercury was for many years, home to one of New Zealand's leading professional theatre companies.

                                            Theatre
As is often the case with actors, the theatre is Richard's first love. The rehearsal process is one of his greatest joys, and the shared experience with the audience (that vital component which is always added last) completes the play, and delivers a reward which outstrips gold.
Richard's professional theatre work history with such companies as J C Williamson, The Mercury, A.I.T, Charles Ross Productions, Prestige Promotions, The Arts Council NZ,  The State Theatre Co of South Australia, The Melbourne Theatre Co, Prince Moo and others, includes such plays as: 

William Shakespeare's Richard the Third (Edward IV, Duke of Norfolk)

King Lear (Knight, Edgar,)   Loves Labours Lost (Lord Dumain)  Othello (Othello)

Ann Jellicoe's The Knack (Colin) 

Tennessee Williams'  The Glass Menagerie (Tom Wingfield)

Eduardo Manet's  The Nuns (Sister Angela)

Jack Hibberd's Dimboola (Leonardo Radish and later,  Angus "Knocka"  Mc Adam)  

Steel Rudd's  On Our Selection (Dad)

Joseph Stein, Jacob Brackman  and  Peter Link's

King of Hearts (Genevieve)

Tom Stoppard's On The Razzle (Coachman and Foreign Gentleman) 

Edward Bond's  Summer (The German)

Roger Hall's  Multiple Choice (Plumber, School Principal)

Greg McGee's  Tooth and Claw (Athol)

Terry Johnson's  Insignificance (Senator)

Noel Coward's  Fallen Angels (Freddie)

Eric Idle's  Pass The Butler (Hugo) 

Tudor Gates'  Who Saw Him Die, in which he understudied the  British actor Lee Montague in the role of (Jack Rawlings) 

"Thank the Lord I never had to go on, Lee Montague is a giant among stage actors and would have been an impossible act to replace, but watching Lee work every performance of the tour was one of the greatest learning opportunities of my life "  RM.

Dylan Thomas' Under Milk Wood [100+ performances]  (First voice and Rev Eli Jenkins) 

Kevin J Wilson's  Cigallo the Clown (Mr Flagpole) and his adaptation of  The Sorcerer's Apprentice  (Sorcerer)

Ian Mune's  Pinocchio Travelling Circus (circus master) Joan and Betty Rayner's  Manka and the King (The King, Tachka, and The Witch)

Craig Harrison's  Tomorrow Will be a Lovely Day  (Lt General Harcourt and Prime Minister)

Ray Cooney and Gene Stone's  Why Not Stay for Breakfast (Hippy)

Richard Moss and Terence Cooper's  presentation of 

An  Evening With Dylan Thomas (First voice, Mr Pritchard,  Rev Jenkins)

Paidric Fallon's  Raftery's Dialogue with the whiskey  (Raftery)

John Guare's  House Of Blue Leaves (Military Policeman)

Peter Weiss'  Marat Sade  (Warder) 

Paul Slabolepszy's double bill, Under The Oaks  leading role of (Corky Jungleblood) and Over The Hill,  leading male role of  ( Charlie)

Two beautifully written plays on a political theme by Australian Playwright Kevin Summers: 

Salvation Jane (Ted Mulhany) The Empty Say leading role (Bill Files)

Isaac Alan's  A Seance for Dylan Thomas (Dafydd Pugh) a centenary production

Andy Nyman & Jeremy Dyson's   Ghost Stories

(Tony Matthews) Prince Moo Australian national tour.

                                   Personal Life

Richard lives in Australia (Vic) with his wife and best pal Lindy and a pussy cat Simone.
He is the proud father of two daughters and two sons, and a proud grandfather to four wonderful granddaughters.
With no intention of retiring, he continues to act, write, study the craft and to apply his voice to characters, commercials and narrations.  
Alongside  theatre and film, his passions include opera, cooking, wine appreciation, vintage and veteran vehicles,  architecture and animals.
Generally indifferent to sport, Richard is an ardent supporter of the magnificent  Hockeyroos.

                             Personal statement 

I have been  devoted to the arts in general and the theatre in particular, for more than 40 years. I have been lucky enough to work for, and with, some of the best people and some of the finest organisations in the world. I have always applied myself to the craft in the best way possible and with all my honesty.
I welcome any new ideas, and new directions or  applications of the theatre and its great magic for the greater good of humankind, but I strongly oppose the corporatisation of the arts, the rampant abuse of theatre by anyone who seek to profit from the lowest common denominator, and to bastardise  a great theatrical tradition by cheapening its works, and misrepresenting its values. 
Richard Moss